TITLE

Wood Biomass Pellet Characterization for Solid Fuel Production in Power Generation

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ABSTRACT

This study aims to compare fuel properties of wood pellet and torrefied wood pellet with coal. Some demerits of woody biomass as fuel include low energy density, high moisture content, easily susceptible to microbial degradation, supply is seasonally dependent, varies chemical and physical properties that has negative effect on the combustion efficiency and transportation. The efficiency of coal power generation on the other hand is around 30% to 40% and released more carbon as compared to biomass. There were five experiments conducted in this study to characterise the chemical and physical properties of coal, wood pellet and torrefied wood pellet namely moisture analysis, Thermo gravimetric Analyser (TGA), Bomb Calorimeter, Organic Elemental Analyser and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The combination of torrefaction and palletisation is promising for upgrading woody biomass to produce to produce less greenhouse gases (GHG) emission like carbon dioxide (CO2) sustainable and contain less sulphur oxides (SOX) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) compared to be used as solid fuel for power generation

KEYWORDS

Torrefaction, wood pellet, coal, solid fuel, biomass, power generation

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Cite this paper

Norfadhilah Hamzah, Mohammad Zandi, Koji Tokimatsu, Kunio Yoshikawa. (2018) Wood Biomass Pellet Characterization for Solid Fuel Production in Power Generation. International Journal of Renewable Energy Sources, 3, 32-40

 

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